【DE】Brief interesting history of the German pavilions

The history of the world exhibition goes back to 1851. At that time, the first world exhibition with the “Great Exhibition of the Industry of all Nations” took place in the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park in the middle of central London. It was initiated by Queen Victoria’s Prince Consort Prince Albert from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Since then, 50 Expos have been organized worldwide:

 

  • 13 in America (most recently in Vancouver in 1986)

 

  • 27 in Europe (most recently in Milan in 2015)

 

  • 8 in Asia (most recently in Astana, Kazakhstan in 2017)

 

  • 2 in Australia (most recently in Brisbane in 1988).

 

The character of the world exhibitions has changed over the centuries: At first they were an industrial and performance show – conceived as a platform for the achievements of industrialization. The countries actually presented technical innovations there, such as the sewing machine (London, 1862), the telephone (Philadelphia, 1876) or the first escalator (Paris, 1900). In addition, architecturally spectacular buildings also played a major role, such as the Crystal Palace in London, where the first world exhibition ever took place, or the Eiffel Tower in Paris, which was built for the Expo in 1889.

 

After the Second World War, the world exhibitions were about bringing the nations closer together again.

 

Today, an expo brings a global topic into focus to talk about the resulting challenges and to present solutions from science, business and culture, for example at the 2000 World Exhibition in Hanover on the topic of “People, Nature, Technology” or in 2010 in Shanghai, where the topic “Better City, Better Life” was about life in cities. In Milan, organizers and participants shed light on the subject of nutrition; the motto of the EXPO 2015 was: “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”.

 

German pavilions over the years

Germany has been a regular participant in world exhibitions over the years; firstly as Prussia, then as the German Empire and later as the Federal Republic of Germany. It was also one of the 33 countries to sign up to the 1928 Paris Convention, which established the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), and has been a BIE member ever since. Germany hosted the 2000 Expo in Hanover and before that the two “specialised expos” in Berlin (1957) and Munich (1965).

 

First Prussia, then the German Empire and later the Federal Republic of Germany were regularly represented at world exhibitions around the globe. When the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), the international exhibition bureau, was founded with the Paris Convention in 1928, Germany was one of the 33 countries that signed the convention. Since then it has been a member of the BIE. In 2000 Germany hosted the Expo in Hanover. Before that, it hosted these two “Specialized Expos” at Expo 1957 in Berlin and Expo 1965 in Munich.

 

1851 London

At the first world exhibition there was only one exhibition buildingthe Crystal Palace. The participants were there with their exhibits sorted by country. Under the umbrella of the German Customs Association, for example, the “Telegraphen-Bauanstalt von Siemens & Halske” is showing a cross-section of its products, including several electric telegraphs and a bell for station guards. Another example: Reinhard Mannesmann was represented in London with products from his “file and cast steel factory”.

 

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The world exhibitions between 1855 and 1873

Heads of state visited the world exhibitions more and more often. Like none before, the 1867 lured the rulers of the world to the French capital, including King Wilhelm I. He paid her a visit in June together with his Chancellor Bismarck and his Chief of Staff von Moltke. It is also known from this world exhibition that the Krupp cannons left a lasting impression on visitors and journalists. The Essen industrialist Alfred Krupp succeeded in building his own pavilion at the 1873 World’s Fair, in which he, as the leading steel producer from Germany, showed his metallurgical exhibits.

 

 

 

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1876 ​​Philadelphia

In 1876 the first world exhibition took place in the USA. It was the first expo at which individual states erected their own building – including the German Reich: In addition to the large thematic presentations in the halls set up by the organizer, the German Commissioner General had a building with a secretariat and reception area for representation. It was designed by the architect Hermann Josef Schwarzmann, who came from Bavaria and emigrated to the USA. However, he primarily made a name for himself as the leading exhibition architect and as such redesigned Fairmont Park into the Expo site. The organizers had also commissioned him to design the central exhibition building.

German industry was less successful at this world exhibition: German products were denied their competitiveness on the world market: They are cheap and bad, and there is also a lack of progressive spirit, judged the German mechanical engineer Franz Reuleaux. He had been sent to Philadelphia as a judge. His harsh words were heard in Germany: he was appointed German general commissioner for the following world exhibitions in Sydney in 1879/80 and in Melbourne in 1880/81.

 

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Melbourne 1880

33 countries participated in the first world exposition in Australia, including the USA, Great Britain and Germany. A number of products made of iron and steel, medicines, jewelry, musical instruments, photographs, wines and natural products from the Pacific region were on display in the exhibition hall. The exhibition palace remained intact even after the world exhibition: in 1901, Australia’s first parliament was constituted there. Today it is a world heritage site.

 

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Paris 1878 and 1889

After 1855 and 1867, the Paris Expo of 1878 was the third world exhibition in the French capital. For France, after the war against Prussia and civil war at home, it was a good opportunity to demonstrate its own resurrection. It was the time of great inventions. Among other things, Thomas Edison presented a further development of the telephone from Alexander Graham Bell’s apparatus and a gramophone. In view of the tense foreign policy relations with France as a former opponent of the war, Germany decided not to take part in this and the following Expo 1889 in Paris. The latter beat all previous expos with over 32 million visitors and a profit of 8 million francs. With the event, France celebrated the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution. Iron dominated the buildings, including the most famous of the Paris World Exhibition of 1889: At more than 300 m high, the Eiffel Tower was a masterpiece of engineering at that time. It should actually be torn down again.

 

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1893 Chicago

After Germany’s highly criticized appearance in Philadelphia, the German Reich wanted to present itself more competitive in Chicago. German companies were well represented in the specialist exhibition halls as well as with their own representative buildings, such as B. the pavilion of the Krupp cast steel factory (“Krupp Gun Exhibit”). A German village that was recognized as part of the German presence was designed by the architect, sculptor and art educator Karl Hoffacker. It was located in the amusement and recreation area of the World’s Fair and consisted of several buildings, e.g. B. a castle, a town hall and several farmhouses, which consequently rather painted a romanticizing picture of life in Germany.

The most representative building of the German Empire was the German House, designed by Johannes Radke, who worked as an architect for the Reichspost in Berlin. German buildings from the 15th and 16th centuries served as models for this: the town hall of Rothenburg ob der Tauber for a tower, the Aschaffenburg Castle for the replica of the castle tower or Nuremberg and Goslar with their half-timbered buildings for the design of the gable.

At the following Expo in Brussels in 1897, Germany was represented, but not with its own building, but with a colonial goods exhibition in one of the organizer’s halls.

 

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1900 Paris

The world exhibition at the beginning of the new century also established the time of the Belle Epoque. It was characterized by modernity, a time of economic growth and belief in progress. Predominantly economic-political considerations prompted the German Reich to take part in this Paris World Exhibition: As in Chicago in 1893, it built its own pavilion in the early Renaissance style, which was again designed by the Imperial Postal Inspector Johannes Radke. The front of the building was decorated with lavish paintings. Under the plaster surface, however, there was a simple wooden construction. The organizers had planned a “Rue des Nations” along the Seine for the participating countries, on which the German House would line up between Spain and Norway. Products from the chemical industry were shown, the steel industry, mechanical engineering and the automotive industry. As in Chicago, there was a German wine bar in the basement of the building, which was very popular. Georg Thielen from Hamburg had designed a pavilion based on the model of a lighthouse at the mouth of the Weser for German merchant shipping. It was built on the Pont d’Iéna.

 

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1904 St. Louis

 

On April 30, 1703, the United States bought Louisiana from France. This 200th anniversary was the occasion for the 1904 Expo in St. Louis – albeit a year late. The site was the largest to date with 5 km2. 1,500 buildings were erected on it, 60 countries took part – including Germany. The architect Bruno Schmitz designed his state building based on the model of the Charlottenburg Palace in Berlin. The main house, 46 m long, 21 m deep and 50 m high in its dome, had an area of 930 m2, the entire facility, which was exposed on a hill, measured 16,000 m2. After the success in Paris in 1900, a German wine restaurant was again housed in an outbuilding.

 

 

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1905 Liege

75 years of Belgian independence were celebrated with this world exhibition. Germany was among the nations that participated from all continents. Very few of them could afford their own state house, neither did Germany: It set up its exhibition in one of the communal halls made available.

 

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1910 Brussels

In Brussels, Germany performed with an entire system. It comprised a built-up area of 33,000 m² and eleven buildings, including the German House and the Munich House, which housed a restaurant, as well as various halls for arts and crafts, industry, machines and railways. Two so-called “model houses” for working-class families, which can be completely dismantled and made of wood, can now be regarded as the first prefabricated houses – including interior fittings that were supplied if required. Less monumental, but rather factual, uniformly planned and designed in the style of a rural villa and estate complex, the zeitgeist of German architecture was reflected in the German appearance.

 

 

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Barcelona 1929

Even today, in the context of the history of the world exhibition, the German Pavilion from 1929 with its clear lines and simple shapes is cited as groundbreaking for the world of architecture. The German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed it in the Bauhaus style. With its novelty and precision, the building was intended to showcase the capabilities of German industry and craft. Mies van der Rohe also designed the furniture for this pavilion, including an armchair that became world famous as the Barcelona chair. Although the pavilion was dismantled after the world exhibition, the city of Barcelona reconstructed it in its original location between 1983 and 1986 due to its importance for architectural history, based on original plans.

 

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1937 Paris

As at no other world exhibition, the location of the pavilions of the German Empire and the Soviet Union manifested the political situation of that time: both buildings faced each other in their entire monumental style. The Berlin architect Albert Speer, commissioned by Adolf Hitler himself, designed the German Pavilion. Directly next to the 140-meter-long “Hall of Honor” in which the exhibition was located was a 50-meter-high tower, which was decorated with the imperial eagle including a swastika in an oak wreath. In a total of 22 different exhibition departments, leather and steel products, ceramics and glass exhibits, but also exhibits relating to precious stone processing, from electrical engineering and from the optical and chemical industries were shown. One area was dedicated to the topic of “Mother and Child”.

 

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The entire architecture of the house – inside and outside – was designed in the style of representative buildings of the Third Reich. Germany did not take part in the following world exhibitions in New York in 1939 and in Port-au-Prince in 1949.

 

1958 Brussels

13 years after the end of the war, Expo ’58 in Brussels offered the young Federal Republic of Germany a good opportunity to present itself as a western democratic state and to counter the nation’s internationally discredited reputation – a highly sensitive diplomatic task. In fact, the German building ensemble in Brussels was a complete alternative to that of Albert Speer in 1937. The architects Sep Ruf and Egon Eiermann were entrusted with its planning, Walter Rossow was responsible for the gardens on the 18,000 m² site. The architects designed a 6,000 m² facility with eight rectangular, one to two-storey pavilions of different sizes, which were arranged around a courtyard and connected by walkways. Glazed all around, they appeared light and transparent. The exhibition was also decidedly cautious: the focus was not on the revitalized economy and the new foreign policy role of the Federal Republic. Rather, it should be about an “ideal show of international cooperation in the sense of joint efforts to humanize technical and industrial progress”, as Federal Chancellor Ludwig Erhard put it.

 

The German presence was reached via a 57 m long steel suspension structure held by a pylon. Donated by the iron and steel industry, it was itself an exhibit. It still exists today: As part of a forest path, it crosses the A3 at the level of the Duisburg city forest and is a listed building.

 

 

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1967 Montreal

Ever since Expo ’58, world exhibitions were no longer solely dedicated to technological progress. In Montreal, too, universal problems facing humanity should be addressed. The architect Frei Otto designed the German Pavilion together with Rolf Gutbrod. The huge tent construction is very reminiscent of the roofing of the Olympic Stadium in Munich, also designed by Otto: held by eight masts as a white plastic net at 31 anchor points, the tent was 130 meters long and 105 meters wide – with an area of 8,000 m². The masts protruded from it. This German pavilion also went down in architectural history and was awarded the Prix Perret named after Auguste Perret. The building itself represented the German art of engineering, but also showed scientific contributions. Part of the exhibition was devoted to the effects of the Second World War. In addition, she addressed the importance of the Gutenberg Bible and the associated revolution in printing technology for the world of writing and communication. Display boards presented the eminent chemist and physicist Otto Hahn, who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1944 for his discovery of nuclear fission.

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1970 Osaka

The Expo in Osaka was the first ever in Asia. “Progress and harmony for humanity” was their main theme. With almost 65 million visitors, more people came to an Expo than ever before. The German appearance was completely new, revolutionary and not entirely undisputed: Germany built the world’s first and so far unique under the motto “Gardens of Music” according to the artistic ideas of the avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen and a concept from the electronic studio of the TU Berlin spherical concert hall, the “spherical auditorium”. The audience sat on a sound-permeable grating below the center of the sphere, surrounded by 50 groups of loudspeakers. They reproduced, so to speak, three-dimensional electroacoustic room compositions that had been specially composed for this unique room. In addition to Bach and Beethoven, works by Bernd Alois Zimmermann and Boris Blacher, among others, were played on a multi-track tape. Stockhausen gave live concerts for over a million visitors with a top-class 19-person ensemble during the 180-day exhibition.

 

 

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1992 Seville

After the GDR joined the BIE in 1974, it was to exhibit at an Expo for the first time in 1992. German reunification thwarted these plans. Designed by the Munich architect Georg Lippsmeier, the most striking feature of the pavilion of reunified Germany was its roof construction: a 54-meter-high pylon at an incline supported a huge oval air-cushion roof made of canvas. Inside, among other things, parts of the Berlin Wall were erected, and in a production by the Berlin set designers Harald Koppelwieser and Manfred Gruber, visitors were able to go on a walk through German cultural history, during which they met Alexander von Humboldt and marveled at the hang glider Otto Lilienthal could.

 

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2000 Hanover

The motto of the first world exhibition in Germany was “People, nature and technology – a new world is emerging”. The declared aim of the organizers was to create a world exhibition of a new type – with visions for the future, models for the balance between people, nature and technology as well as opportunities for more than six billion people worldwide to live together. Since Germany was the host of this world exhibition, the German pavilion took on a special position: From the beginning it was planned as a building that was to be reused at the end of Expo 2000. The most characteristic of the pavilion is its glass facade, which is curved inward. The wooden roof rests on pillars that are also largely made of glass. Architect and builder Josef Wund from Friedrichshafen realized it.

 

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The exhibition was divided into three parts: Thinking – Feeling – Acting. First of all, the visitors moved on scaffolding walkways through the “Ideas Workshop Germany”, a stylized sculpture workshop. Sculptures and busts of well-known and less well-known Germans from politics, culture, business, science and sport were on display here. They stood for the past, present and future of Germany with ideas that have brought the country forward and should help. In the second area, “Feeling”, a film could be seen on two 360 degrees, accessible over six “bridges to the future”. The film showed images from the then more recent German history, present and future. In the last part, the “Mosaic Germany”, visitors were able to marvel at 16 exhibits related to the “Tree of Knowledge”.

 

 

 

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2010 Shanghai

The first world exhibition in China took place in 2010 under the theme “Better City, Better Life”. Shanghai with its 23 million inhabitants was the perfect venue to deal with the challenges of urbanization. With 73 million visitors and 246 participants it was an expo of superlatives. The German Pavilion was called “balancity”, a city in balance. The architects from Schmidhuber + Partner (Munich) had created a building with three bodies that supported each other and kept each other in balance, covered with a silver textile membrane.

 

 

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Inside, it went through urban themed spaces in which tradition and innovation, urbanity and nature, globalization and national identity were described as a pleasant life in balance. The conclusion and at the same time the highlight was an emotional show in which the 600 visitors gathered there made a huge ball with pictures vibrate by shouting. The agency Milla und Partner from Stuttgart was responsible for the exhibition concept.

 

 

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2015 Milan

The German pavilion “Fields of Ideas” was based on the motto of the Expo 2015“Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”: Germany presented itself as a living, fertile landscape full of ideas for the nutrition of the future. Under the motto “Be active!”, The pavilion made it possible to experience how important an appreciative approach to nature is for food security, and invited visitors to become active themselves. In order to immerse themselves in the six subject areas of water, soil, climate, biodiversity, food and the garden of ideas, everyone received a so-called SeedBoard, a 20 by 10 centimeter fold-out piece of corrugated cardboard. The inner surface turned out to be a projection surface for all virtual content in the pavilion – texts, images, films or games.

 

 

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The concept for the exhibition came again from the Stuttgart agency Milla und Partner. The pavilion, which was once again designed by the Munich architects Schmidhuber + Partner, with its gently sloping landscape level, was reminiscent of a piece of German field and corridor landscape with a freely accessible surface and the themed exhibition inside. The central design element were stylized plants that grew to the surface as “seedlings of ideas” from the exhibition. As solar trees, they generated the electricity for the pavilion illumination at night. With its gently rising landscape level, it was reminiscent of a piece of German field and corridor landscape with a freely accessible surface and the themed exhibition inside. The central design element were stylized plants that grew to the surface as “seedlings of ideas” from the exhibition. As solar trees, they generated the electricity for the pavilion illumination at night. With its gently rising landscape level, it was reminiscent of a piece of German field and corridor landscape with a freely accessible surface and the themed exhibition inside. The central design element were stylized plants that grew to the surface as “seedlings of ideas” from the exhibition. As solar trees, they generated the electricity for the pavilion illumination at night.

 

 

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From October 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022   Expo 2020  Dubai

 

The global effects of the corona pandemic also have an impact on Expo 2020 Dubai. At the request of the United Arab Emirates, the member states of the Bureau International des Expositions decided that the world exhibition in Dubai would be postponed by one year. It now takes place from October 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022.

 

 

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A world exhibition is a place of discovery and meeting of people from different nations. It connects across borders with the common goal of developing solutions and innovations for a better future. The claim of Expo 2020 Dubai “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future” sums it up. In 2020, however, the health and safety of all people are more important than ever, #stayhome and social distancing protect against further spread of the virus. An opening of the Expo in October 2020 is unfortunately not possible under these conditions.

 

The Expo is the first world exhibition in the Arab world and at the same time with the highest number of foreign visitors ever: Up to 25 million visits to the Expo 2020 are expected, around 70% from outside the United Arab Emirates. Over 200 countries, international organizations and companies  represented in Dubai.

 

The Al Wasl Plaza

The heart of the center of the Expo site is the Al Wasl Plaza. The square is spanned by a huge dome with a filigree honeycomb structure. The dome has an impressive height of 70 meters. The construction becomes a 360-degree projection surface, the largest in the world.

 

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Al Wasl is not only the historical name for Dubai, the Arabic word also means “connection” – a metaphor for the Expo motto “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future”, because the world exhibition wants to bring people together. The opening and closing ceremonies will take place under the dome of the Al Wasl Plaza – to name just two of the cultural highlights during the six-month Expo 2020.

 

 

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The host country’s pavilion

A further highlight is certainly the host country’s own pavilion. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has chosen the design submitted by star architect Santiago Calatrava, which is based on the idea of a falcon in flight. The inspiration came from the falcons that Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the country’s founding father, sent to bring together the region’s tribes, thereby creating a national identity that ultimately gave birth to the United Arab Emirates. The UAE Pavilion at the 2020 World Expo thus is a symbol intended to form a connection between participants and the host country – another reflection of the Expo theme.

 

 

 

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Various exhibition areas, an auditorium, restaurants and VIP lounges will be found here on 15,000 m2. The building is characterized by a special sustainability standard.

 

 

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The themed pavilions

The theme pavilions on the areas of “Sustainability”, “Mobility” and “Opportunity” also promise to be the highlights of Expo 2020. This is what the three architectural offices commissioned by the hosts stand for: while Foster + Partners (London) are planning the Mobility Pavilion, Grimshaw Architects (London) designed the Sustainability Pavilion, and Bjarke Ingels is taking care of the Opportunity Pavilion with BIG (Copenhagen) . All three buildings will be re-used after the world exhibition, for example the Sustainability Pavilion as a museum.

 

 

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Architecture of the German Pavilion -The CAMPUS GERMANY exhibition

The CAMPUS GERMANY exhibition and the cultural program have also been further developed and are currently being finalized. The agency facts and fiction presented the exhibits from the exhibition of the German Pavilion to the representatives of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) and Koelnmesse on several dates.

 

Koelnmesse is responsible for the organization and operation of the German Pavilion at Expo 2020 in Dubai on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. The concept, planning and realization of the German Pavilion are the responsibility of the “Arbeitsgemeinschaft Deutscher Pavillon Expo 2020 Dubai” from the two companies facts and fiction GmbH (Cologne) and NUSSLI Adunic AG (Hüttwilen, Switzerland). The Frankfurt agency VOSS + FISCHER is responsible for the culture program “Culture Lab” together with the culture and media manager Mike P. Heisel as a working group.

The German pavilion with the CAMPUS GERMANY exhibition is located on the Expo site in the field of sustainability, one of the three major focus topics alongside mobility and opportunities. During their stay at CAMPUS GERMANY, visitors are confronted with the relevant questions relating to the Expo topic and can take home ideas for their own lives from the exhibition as a contribution to a future worth living in.

 

The architecture designed by LAVA (Laboratory for Visionary Architecture) for the German Pavilion also reflects the underlying CAMPUS idea. Rather than being a building in the traditional sense, it is a vertical ensemble of building volumes, surrounded by a connecting element, much like a park surrounds a CAMPUS, just vertically.

 

 

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This profusion of structures represents Germany’s federal system and the diversity of its industry and research sectors. The cubes stacked one on top of the other combine with enclosed voids in an interplay that results in a fascinating alternation between interior and exterior spaces and many exciting and surprising perspectives. Between the cubes with the three labs visitors will repeatedly find themselves in the galleries of the open atrium, where they can experience CAMPUS GERMANY in all its spectacular diversity.

 

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The atrium is the real heart of the pavilion: a green, open area, offering many surprising perspectives and panoramic views. A place where lots of things happen at the same time – in the exhibition, on the stage and in the restaurant. On all levels, there will be people exploring the pavilion, chatting and enjoying the campus atmosphere. CAMPUS GERMANY will be a transparent place – multi-faceted, diverse, varied and lively: a place for people. This is a concept that makes the building itself part of the exhibition, turning it into a tool with which to connect people and content – true to the Expo theme of “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future”.

 

 

 

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CAMPUS GERMANY PRESENTS EXPO 2020 DUBAI CONTRIBUTION

 

With just a few days to go before it opens to the public, the German Expo pavilion in Dubai held a hybrid press conference on Tuesday. On hand to answer journalists’ questions were German Ambassador, Ernst Peter Fischer, Senior Vice President International at Koelnmesse, Denis Steker, the Commissioner General of the German Pavilion, Dietmar Schmitz, and the spokesman for the German Pavilion Expo 2020 Dubai Consortium, Andreas Horbelt. As well as including a sneak preview of the Pavilion’s cultural programme and its exhilarating grand finale show, the event was an opportunity for the team to show that they are all geared up for the next six months.

 

Besides numerous local journalists, the opening press conference for the German Pavilion at Expo was attended by representatives from the Expo Bureau, members of the German Emirati Joint Council for Industry and Commerce, the German Pavilion partners, partners of the German Expo Consortium and representatives of the businesses involved in the pavilion. Germany’s Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates, Ernst Peter Fischer, told the audience, “Germany loves Expo and Expo loves Germany. Welcome all to our breathtaking CAMPUS GERMANY Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai! Discover an amazing and fun exhibition in stunning architecture that will make you feel part of a big family. We can’t wait to welcome you!”

 

Dietmar Schmitz, Commissioner General of the German Pavilion, presented Germany’s diverse programme of cultural events, explaining, “We intend to present Germany not only through its innovations and ideas, but also through its culture, customs and hospitality. In addition to the permanent exhibition and the spectacular shows, the German Pavilion will therefore host numerous cultural events.” The cultural programme will include a range of up-and-coming bands from Germany, giving them a platform to promote themselves and their music to a wider audience. There will also be regular themed events, such as gaming days or karaoke nights. In the “science sessions”, visitors of all ages will get a hands-on look at the world of science. There will be plenty of physical activities too, with dance and sports offering intercultural experiences and a chance for everyone to join in the action.

 

Gerald Böse, President and CEO of Koelnmesse, was particularly positive about how his team would perform, explaining, “Koelnmesse is now ready to run the pavilion and offer our guests a fantastic exhibition experience. This is only possible with a large team of motivated and highly skilled staff who will guide visitors on their journey through CAMPUS GERMANY. After countless hours of interviews, the Koelnmesse team recruited and trained new staff members so that they are fully prepared to respond to any question or request our visitors may have.”

 

Speaking as the official spokesman for the German Pavilion Expo 2020 Dubai Consortium, Andreas Horbelt said, “Our aim with the German Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai is to create a place that not only showcases sustainable innovations made in Germany but also gives visitors the feeling of being part of a community. The idea behind our German Pavilion concept is to make people aware of how urgently joint action is needed in the fight against climate change. And we’ve set out to do that using an approach that’s fun and provides lots of ways to engage interactively with this complex topic.”

 

 

© German Pavilion Expo 2020 Dubai / Bjoern Lauen

28/09/2020 – Press conference on the opening of the German Pavilion

 

 

© German Pavilion Expo 2020 Dubai / Bjoern Lauen
01.10.2021 – The German Pavilion at Expo 2020 in Dubai was officially opened. From left: Deputy Commissioner General and Director of the German Pavilion Sebastian Rosito, German Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates Ernst Peter Fischer, Commissioner General of the German Pavilion Dietmar Schmitz, German Consul General Holger Mahnicke.

 

ROAST APPLE AT CAMPUS GERMANY

 

Four guys, all in their early 20s, who talk about life, love and partying. They are a voice for their generation. On stage, ROAST APPLE release an energy that is second to none. Their sound draws on the musical influences of all the members, from Two Door Cinema Club, Jungle and Parcels to Abba and Chic. Roast Apple are four friends with rough edges, who smile at life with a lot of charm and humor. They are true entertainers and make every human’s heart melt every now and then.

 

 

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